Assessment of Knowledge and Practice Regarding Foot Care among Type 2 Diabetic Patients Attending Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (Skims), Soura, Srinagar, Jammu And Kashmir

  • Kavita Bharti MSc Nursing Student, Madr-e-Meharban Institute of Nursing Sciences and Research, SKIMS Deemed University, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
  • Dilshada Wani Principal, Madr-e-Meharban Institute of Nursing Sciences & Research, Department of Medical Surgical Nursing SKIMS Deemed university Jammu & Kashmir
  • Suby Annu Tutor, Madr-e-Meharban Institute of Nursing Sciences and Research, Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing, SKIMS, Deemed University, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
  • Rameez Nabi MSc Nursing Student, Madr-e-Meharban Institute of Nursing Sciences and Research, SKIMS Deemed University, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
  • Uzma iqbal MSc Nursing Student, Madr-e-Meharban Institute of Nursing Sciences and Research, SKIMS Deemed University, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
  • Sumera Hassan MSc Nursing Student, Madr-e-Meharban Institute of Nursing Sciences and Research, SKIMS Deemed University, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
Keywords: Type 2 diabetic patients, foot care, knowledge, practice

Abstract

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or when the body cannot effectively use insulin. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to assess the knowledge and practice level among diabetic patients regarding this disease and to find the association of knowledge and practice level with selected demographic/ clinical variables.

Methodology: A non-experimental descriptive design was selected to carry out the study. It was conducted in 2020 among 100 type 2 diabetic patients. The sample was selected by the non-probability purposive sampling technique.

Results: The findings of the present study showed that the majority (41%) of the study subjects had satisfactory, 30% had poor, and 29% had good knowledge regarding foot care. The mean ± SD of the knowledge level was 41.1±9.86. With regards to practice, the majority (48%) of the study subjects had poor, 40% had satisfactory, whereas only 12% had poor practice regarding foot care. The mean ± SD of the practice level was found to be 5.91 ± 2.26. The association of knowledge and practice with demographic/ clinical variables was found to be significant with residence, education, occupation, and monthly family income.

Conclusion: The findings led to the conclusion that the knowledge regarding foot care was satisfactory and practice was poor among type 2 diabetic patients. Therefore, there is a need to conduct awareness programmes about foot care among type 2 diabetic patients.

How to cite this article:
Bharti K, Wani D, Annu S, Nabi R, Iqbal U Hassan S. Assessment of Knowledge and Practice regarding Foot Care among Type 2 Diabetic Patients attending Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir. Epidem Int. 2022;7(1):7-12.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24321/2455.7048.202202

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Published
2022-06-15