Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Computer Vision Syndrome among Medical Students in Goa

  • Jagadish A Cacodcar Professor and Head, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
  • Tanvi Poy Raiturcar Senior Resident, Department of Ophthalmology, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
  • Rea R C Fernandes MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
  • Shikha R Dessai MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
  • Varda Sinai Kantak MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
  • Rutuja Naik MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
Keywords: Goa, KAP, Computer Vision Syndrome, Medical Students

Abstract

Introduction: There has been a tremendous increase in the use of computers and other screens by young adults in educational institutions for education, communication, and recreation. This can lead to computer vision syndrome. Computer vision syndrome includes a variety of symptoms faced by individuals who use computers for long hours every day. Most early symptoms are not recognized and the condition goes undiagnosed. Creating public awareness about the healthy use of computers is the need of the hour.

Aim: To study knowledge, attitudes and practices of computer vision syndrome among medical students in Goa.

Methods:

Settings and Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

Study Duration: 1 month (June 2020)

Statistical Analysis Tools Used: Simple percentages and proportions.

Result: It is seen that among participants who use digital devices for more than 6 hours, 39 (92.9%) were symptomatic. 62 (57.4%) participants experienced worsening of symptoms due to lockdown.

Conclusion: The present study revealed that more than three‑fourths of the students complained of one or more symptoms of computer vision syndrome while working on the devices.

How to cite this article:
Cacodcar JA, Raiturcar TP, Fernandes RRC, Dessai SR, Kantak VS, Naik R. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Computer Vision Syndrome among Medical Students in Goa. Epidem Int. 2021;6(1):9-14.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24321/2455.7048.202102

Author Biographies

Jagadish A Cacodcar, Professor and Head, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.

Professor and Head

Department of Preventive and social Medicine

Goa Medical College and Hospital

Rea R C Fernandes, MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.

MBBS Student

Goa Medical College and Hospital

Shikha R Dessai, MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.

MBBS Student

Goa Medical College and Hospital

Varda Sinai Kantak, MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.

MBBS Student

Goa Medical College and Hospital

Rutuja Naik, MBBS Student, Goa Medical College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.

MBBS Student

Goa Medical College and Hospital

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Published
2021-05-26