Cultural Beliefs Associated with Menstruation and Link with Mental Illness-An Indian Male’s Perspective

  • Harneet Kaur Senior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0800-7605
  • BS Chavan Professor and Head, Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Sector 32, Chandigarh.
Keywords: Culture, Beliefs, Menstruation, Indian, Mental illness

Abstract

Introduction: Menstruation is a natural biological phenomenon that is related to fertility and motherhood and overall womanhood, thus differentiating women from men as an individual. Since ancient times, there have been many cultural beliefs and taboos related to menstruation like restriction in entering kitchen or religious places. Menstruation has also been linked to many health issues including mental illness. The current study was planned to explore the cultural beliefs related to menstruation, amenorrhoea and its link with mental illness from an Indian male’s perspective. Aim and Objective: To explore the cultural beliefs related to menstruation, amenorrhoea and its link with mental illness from an Indian male’s perspective. Methodology: This was an open label, cross-sectional study conducted at Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. Willfully participating male caregivers of psychiatry patients were included. Result and Conclusion: A majority of caregivers lacked knowledge about menstruation as a large number of them were not aware of biological reason and source of bleeding and considered menstruation as a detoxification process in which the impure blood having toxins and rays is expelled out. Amenorrhoea was believed to cause adverse effects including mental illness.

How to cite this article:

Kaur H, Chavan BS. Cultural Beliefs Associated with Menstruation and Link with Mental IllnessAn Indian Male’s Perspective. J Adv Res Psychol Psychother 2020; 3(1): 7-12

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24321/2581.5822.202002

References

Garg S, Anand T. Menstruation related myths in India: strategies for combating it. J Family Med Prim Care 2015; 4(2): 184-186.

Marván ML, Vázquez-Toboada R, Chrisler JC. Ambivalent sexism, attitudes towards menstruation and menstrual cycle-related symptoms. Int J Psychol 2014; 49(4): 280-287.

Poureslami M, Osati-Ashtiani F. Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior of Adolescent Girls in Suburban Districts of Tehran About Dysmenorrhea and Menstrual Hygiene. Journal of International Women’s Studies 2013; 3(2): 51-61.

Puri S, Kapoor S. Taboos and Myths Associated with Womens Health among Rural and Urban Adolescent Girls in Punjab. Research Gate 2006; 31(4).

Wong WC, Li MK, Chan WYV, Choi YY, Fong CHS, Lam KWK. A cross-sectional study of the beliefs and attitudes towards menstruation of Chinese undergraduate males and females in Hong Kong. Journal of Clinical Nursing 2013; 22(23-24): 3320-3327.

Published
2020-04-20